COMM330 - A. FOX



Vocabulary - Advanced Oral Interpretation

(Experimental Theatre:Creating and Staging Texts by Judy E. Yordon)

Chapter 1 (Introduction to Experimental Group Productions)

Theatre Modes:

lyric-mode
dramatic-mode
epic-mode
theatrical complement
presentational (cool)
representational (hot)

Readers Theatre:

synecdochical spectacle.
theatrical complements

Three types:

1. single-text script
2. compiled scripts: expanded program
3. compiled scripts; collage

Chamber theatre -

literature used
offstage focus
onstage focus
lyric lines -
dramatic lines -
epic lines -
bifurcation
trifucation
narrator’s role -

Chapter 2 (Readers Theatre: Creating the Script)

single-text orchestration
production concept
dramatic analysis
character voices
tag lines
tone color (sounds)
alliteration
assonance
onomatopoeia
literary and sensory imagery
allusion
apostrophe
hyperbole
litotes
metaphor
metonymy
oxymoron
paradox
personification
simile
synecdoche
sensory imagery
visual
auditory
olfactory
gustatory
tactile
kinetic
kinesthetic
thermal
rhythm
expanded program compiled script
thematic program
single author program
literary style program
historical period program
collage compiled script
triggering
composition structure
causal
sonata
contingent structure
rondo
speech structure
theme-and-variation
music structure
antiphonal

Chapter 3 (Readers Theatre: Staging the Script)


casting
blocking
proscenium stage
stage directions
focus
onstage focus
offstage focus
open
offstage cross focus
combination focus
movement
suggestion
economy
kinesic behavior
behavioral synecdoche
freeze
speeded up action
slow motion
sets
simple
suggestion
symbol/metaphor
staging
thrust stage
in-the-round stage
alley stage
proscenium stage
lighting
specific illumination (shadow-producing)
general illumination (non shadow-producing)
selective visibility
revelation-of-form
illusion-of-nature
pictorial composition
emotional and psychological effects
costumes
suggestion
properties (props)
real or mimed
media
music
film
video
slides

Chapter 4 (Chamber Theatre: Creating the Script)
differences between conventional theatre and chamber theatre:

1. interplay between narrator and characters,
2. narrator is central and major "character,".
3. action takes place in the past narrator's vision is emphasized by the staging and physical representation on the stagedeal with "telling" and "showing"
4. narrator is the only one who exists in the virtual present
5. narrator move between virtual past and the virtual present
6.point of view is always the narrator's


Chamber theatre always deals with the now and the then, the present and the past, telling and showing.

First-person narrators may be unreliable:
first-person major character
first-person minor character - tend to be more reliable as they are generally more objective
first-person nonparticipating witness
narrator unreliability - children, liars, mentally ill, unaware of the reality of their situations

Third-person narrators:
third-person total omniscience
third-person limited omniscience- reflection of the major character
third-person objective

Second-person narrator (p. 106)

Narrator and time:
story time - time this story took place
discourse time - how much time each part of the story will take

Rhythm is determined by the narrator
- summary (faster), scene (real time), description (slower)
narrator goes into the mind of the character: lyric scene, lyric summary, lyric description

Narrative style (how a story is told):
diction (language)
short and simple
complex and unusual
emotion
tempered and controlled
judgmental
descriptive
vernacular
jargon
slang
regional
idioms
old-fashioned


syntax (the way words and sentences are linked)
normal syntax
convoluted or unusual syntax
cause-effect patterns
long or complex sentences
short exclamations
rhetorical questions

Narrative roles:
moralizer
double
camera eye
minimal narrative intrusion (scene)
simultaneous action (crosscutting)
attention to detail, angle, perspective

Narrator’s rhetorical voice
what are the narraator's specific intentions
who is the narrator’s audience (sometimes in story)
often up to individual interpretation (subject, diction and syntax, ending)

general techniques for adapting prose fiction texts for the stage
lyric-mode texts (mainly description)
dramatic-mode texts (mainly dialogue)
epic-mode texts (mixed)

EXTERNAL MODE:

the nature of the speaker
the type of experience
the elements of time and place

INTERNAL MODE:

who is being addressed at any given time

Epic-mode lines (generally directly to the audience):


further the story line
establish time and place
summarize
provide transitions
reveal information

Dramatic-mode lines
:

direct discourse
indirect discourse
narrator
character talk of themselves in third person and the past tense
narrator -imitating character, revealing attitude toward character
both - simultaneously

Lyric-mode lines:
reveal characters’ thoughts and feelings in the characters’ vocabulary
and syntax (narrator or character)

tag lines may be omitted











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